Changing Majors

Blogger: Tim Ellis

I’m not sure off the top of my head the statistics concerning how many college students change majors throughout their undergraduate careers.  I would bet it’s a pretty high number.  Whatever the stats say I definitely fall into the numbers of those who have, for whatever reason, changed majors.

My path through UT Dallas did not start as a freshman.  I started my college days at North Lake Community College in Irving, TX (a great institution by the way).  As a CC student I did not feel the pressure that a student at a four-year university may have felt to pick a major.  For a student such as me, who was planning to go on and get a bachelor’s degree, the name of the game is to just finish your core classes and move on to a university.  I did however know that I wanted to get a degree in business management.  The thought of specializing did not really occur to me at that point.  So in the fall of 2004 I began at North Lake looking to get a field of study degree in general business to transfer to a four-year school.

My first “change of major” was not a true one.  At the time I was working as a personal trainer at a fitness club in Bedford, TX.  As you may be able to understand I got this crazy idea to start taking classes that I would need for a kinesiology.  The long and the short of this great decision is that I got sidetracked and I started to take classes off of my plan, which set me back quite a bit.  Once I got my head cleared and the path righted I took my first intro to accounting class in fall 2006.  This was sort of a book mark moment for me, I knew that I could viably choose this path as a major, but life events would change this.

After taking my first two accounting courses at community college, I had to take a year off from my studies (Semper Fidelis).  This all ended up with me finally transferring to UT Dallas in the fall of 2009.  When I first got accepted to UTD I picked an operations management major.  However, within a few months of this (in the interim period before the semester started) I realized that accounting would be a better fit for me.  My uncle, an accounting graduate, had told me way back when I was learning that A = L + OE that if I understand debits and credits I may want to major in the subject.  Well, that is kind of precisely what happened (my wife takes credit for my change of major, and she did help push me in that direction).

I suppose that all of the above paragraphs are my long-winded way of saying that life events and various factors all contribute to why students change their minds about what to study.  I think that this is an issue that ultimately will take care of itself for most people.  I’m glad I stuck with business, and even as my life is on pause for CPA studying ( I’m not asking for sympathy), I am pretty satisfied that the last seven years and flavor of the week classes have led me to this point.  If you happen to be a student reading this post, it’s probably because events have rightly led you to this point, too.

About txcpa2b

The Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants (TSCPA) is a nonprofit, voluntary, professional organization representing Texas CPAs. TSCPA has 20 local chapters statewide and has 27,000 members. The Society is committed to serving the public interest with programs that advance the highest standards of ethics and practice within the CPA profession. TXCPA2B is a blog written by Texas students in pursuit of the CPA certificate. The views expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily held by TSCPA or our members.
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